Category Archives: March

Saludan Festival

The culture of the town of Tigbauan reflects a society with diverse influences and traditions. And to express this cultural richness, Saludan a cultural festivity was organized to showcase the town’s distinct traditional activity in a celebration of dance and music. A dialect used for the “crude method of threshing rice or catching fingerlings through nets,” Saludan is one of Iloilo’s emerging festivals.

Aside from the way of life of the people of Tigbauan, the Saludan Festival also centers on the town’s colorful history. Tigbauan was the site of the first Jesuite Boarding School for boys, the first educational center in the Philippines; Furthermore, it is the home of a regional fisheries research institution, the Aquaculture Department of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC); and the town is also the place where the American Liberation Forces landed on 18 March 1945 which led to the Liberation of the islands of Panay and Romblon. These milestones are a source of pride for the people of Tigbauan.

The Saludan is held every last week of October. The four day event opens with a food festival, Trade Fair, and a Beauty pageant. The gem of the festivity is the tribe competition.

 

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Talong Festival

Barangay Oyungan, Miagao, Iloilo will celebrates its first <b>Tarong Festival</b> on March 24-26, 2017. This year’s theme, “Pasidunggan kag Pasalamatan,” will focus on the thriving industry of eggplant production of the Barangay.

Join the fun. Stop by to enjoy their original, old-fashioned festival celebration with daily activities for everyone. March 24 (Friday) Mass at 7 a.m., Caravan at 8 a.m., Opening of Agro-Trade Fair at 9 a.m., Battle of the Mini Sound at 11 a.m., Barangay Night at 7 p.m.; March 25 (Saturday) Cavalcade of Dances from Oyungan Elementary School at 7 a.m., A Talk on the History of Taring by Mr. Vicente Natino, President, PASAKA-UBOS Irrigators Association at 9 a.m. Barangay Plaza, Eggplant Picking for visitors and guests, Symposium on Planting and Marketing Eggplant at 3 p.m., Lin-ay Kang Tarong Festival 2017 at 6 p.m.; March 26 (Sunday) Mass at 9:30 a.m., Sugbahan sa Binit Dalan and Boodle Fight, Raffle and Pinaka Contest at 11 a.m., Awarding at 7 p.m.

The eggplant fields in Barangay Oyungan have provided the whole town of Miagao with the product all year round. Honoring the most abundant product of the Barangay, the Tarong Festival is a celebration of the land of Oyungan, honouring its agricultural traditions and the farmers. It is one of the fastest growing areas of the town producing rice, corn and truckloads of eggplants. Harvest season produces 100 sacks of eggplants daily.

Belonging to the nightshade family like tomatoes, potatoes and bell peppers, eggplants locally known as talong, it is a vegetable long prized for its beauty as well as its unique taste and texture. Eggplants are native to the Indian subcontinent, but are now found throughout the world in a number of different cultural cuisines. In England, the vegetable is called “aubergine.” It reached the Middle East and the Mediterranean region approximately 800 years ago, and was being referenced in England by the 16th century.

Eggplants grow by hanging from the vines of a plant that grows several feet in height. It is best known for its dark purple color but comes in a variety of shapes from small and oblong to long and skinny. The flesh is cream colored and spongy in consistency with seeds arranged in a conical pattern. It has a pleasantly bitter taste and spongy texture. Eggplant can be baked, roasted in the oven, or steamed.

Eggplant has a unique range of health benefits, including an ability to help build strong bones and prevent osteoporosis, reduce symptoms of anemia, increase cognitive function, improve cardiovascular health, protect the digestive system, help lose weight, manage diabetes, reduce stress, protect infants from birth defects, and even prevent cancer.

Situated six kilometers away from the poblacion on the way to the next municipality, Barangay Oyungan is a friendly, old-fashioned agricultural and fishing community. It is the 3rd biggest in terms of population numbering to 420 households of 2,000 residents.

To get to the barangay, one can take a Tigbauan, Guimbal, Miagao or San Joaquin jeepneys at the Don Benito Q. Acap Sr. Southern Iloilo Perimeter Boundary in Barangay Mohon, Oton or when in the city, at the market situated at the back of Robinsons Place Iloilo. For more information, please contact Hon. Remia Nuevaespana – Barangay Captain at 09079981900.

Pintados De Pasi Festival

3rd week of March
City of Passi
4th District, Iloilo


Regarded as one of the region’s most prestigious festivals and is consistently mentioned as a do-not-miss festival in Iloilo, the annual celebration of Pintados de Pasi every 3rd week of March is an amazing celebration that fosters a rich sense of cultural heritage and awareness of the town.

The islands of the Visayas where tribesmen wore the most elaborate, intricate and extensive etchings that led Spanish chroniclers to call the island “La Isla De Los Pintados” or “Islands of the Painted Ones.” It was said that when Spanish authorities arrived in the island, they were welcomed by a group of heavily tattooed men.

Traditionally, the art of tattooing was part of a ritual and portrayed elements of achievement and status of the person wearing the tattoo. Tribal tattoos had profound personal attachments to them.

Commonly done in black ink, the marks are of thick lines with geometric shapes and beautiful pattern. Tattoos were used on men to show tribal seniority, accomplishments, age, and power, as well as acting as talismans in certain cases. It describes their fundamental identity as tribes-people, head hunters, warriors, and community members. Tattoos were earned through the passage of rites ceremonies and for accomplishing specific tasks. Both the men and the women were tattooed, and for a variety of reasons. The Visayan men were warriors, commonly head hunters with strong, detailed lines on their chests and heads. The designs or patterns in their body parts would get more elaborate the more enemies they would kill. The women have simpler patterns on their arms and wrists and were regarded as marks of beauty.

The festival highlight is the tribal dance competition where participants paint their body with elaborate patterns and shapes. The dance is characterized by the flow, a seamless stream of movements that emphasizes the agility of the upper body with simultaneous alternating waving of arms which are the basic movement of the Pintados dance. The dance involves leaping, turning, jumping and kicking movements of a warrior.

The celebration honours their tattooed ancestors such that wearing their tattoo design during their dance presentations is their great way to show respect for their traditional culture.


Pagdaug – Saludan Festival

3rd week of March
Municipality of Miagao
1st District, Iloilo


Saludan, a Hiligaynon term coined from the word salud, the traditional way of gathering or accumulating a thing for its interest or value such as threshing rice using a basket or catching fingerlings through nets.

Fishing and farming has been Tigbauan’s way of life for several generations. They grow many crops and fish for food. This is not only for survival means but also to bring families together to celebrate the planting and harvesting seasons, to share ideas on how to maintain a farmland’s fertility and to take good care of their seas. And also it is to impart this knowledge of farming and fishing to the younger generation. Their lifestyles and festivities are thus exclusively linked to the annual celebration of their festival.

The traditional harvest festivity of Saludan is celebrated alongside Pagdaug, a festival segment commemorating the annual observance of the Liberation of Panay. The festivity has become the symbol of Tigbauans’ esteem not only in terms of its abundant varieties of local produce but also for the honoured Tigbauanons who served and died, and all who supported the World War II effort from this town.

The festival highlight is the tribe performances that illuminate the Japanese experience during the WWII era with personal stories. Symbolic of the defining event are dramatizations of some chilling reminders of its Japanese wartime existence. The presentations will draw on the commemorative experiences of spectators watching by capturing, in the audiences’ own words, their individual reflections on those Tigbauanons who have sacrificed their lives during WWII.